Tag Archives: disability

Amulets

Amulets

A review of Heidi Heilig’s “The Long Road” in Unbroken: 13 Stories Starring Disabled Teens (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2018).

By Derek Newman-Stille

Heidi Heilig’s “The Long Road” begins like many trope-filled stories about disability does – with a self-loathing disabled character seeking a cure. The trope of “the cure” and especially “the magic cure” is built into a large number of fantasy stories, creating a quest for characters around the discovery of a cure, or having characters use magic to transform their bodies into normate bodies.

The difference with Heilig’s narrative, is that although her disabled narrator begins a long quest with her family wearing protective amulets to ward off evil (since her disability is seen as a marker of evil) toward Persia where her family believes there will be a cure… Heilig switches the narrative, breaking from the typical fantasy “magical cure” trope and instead allowing her character to gradually realize that the notion of “the cure” is a problematic one that causes her to view her body as a problem to be “fixed” and instead starts to question the idea of normalcy, realizing that bodies are far more complex than her family had led her to believe. It is only through finding a disabled community and companionship with another disabled person that Heilig’s protagonist is able to begin to re-assess everything she has taken for granted as “truth” for so long.

Heilig reminds her readers that we frequently find knowledge and new ideas within our own disabled community and that we construct our own community as we find other people like ourselves who don’t make us feel like outsiders or exiles. Heilig makes the exile literal by having her characters wander the desert in search of a cure, believing that they can return home “normal”, but although her character searches for normalcy (which is so often the fantasy quest attributed to disabled characters), instead she finds the power of community and challenging her assumptions. Rather than a physical transformation, Heilig presents her readers with a transformation in thought and perspective, an awakening to new possibilities for disabled existence rather than the erasure of disability.

To find out more about Unbroken: 13 Stories Starring Disabled Teens, visit https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374306502

To discover more about Heidi Heilig, visit http://www.heidiheilig.com

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An Interview of Ulla Kriebernegg About Ageing Narratives

By Derek Newman-Stille

Ulla Kriebernegg is an Associate Professor at the Centre for Inter-American Studies at the University of Graz, Austria. Dr. Kriebernegg’s research primarily focusses on Inter-American literary and cultural studies, with attention to Jewish-American Literature and Ageing Studies. She is the chair of the European Network of Ageing Studies and an executive board member for the International Association of Inter-American Studies.

In this episode of Dis(Abled) Embodiment, Dr. Kriebernegg and I talk about Ageing Studies, with a particular focus on the literary and cultural representation of ageing. We examine the way that ageing is expressed in our cultural imagination, particularly looking at the anxieties, uncertainties, and hopes that get attached to images of Long Term Care. We explore narratives of care and responses to ideas of care, examining connecting ideas of gender, sexuality, and difference. We talk about differences in the way that long term care occurs in different nationalities and the different imaginative possibilities that exist for re-thinking long term care.

In addition, we examine Care Home Stories: Ageing, Disability, and Long Term Residential Care co-edited by Dr. Kriebernegg and Dr. Sally Chivers. Care Home Stories, published by Columbia University Press, is a collection of essays that examines the stereotypes and assumptions that exist around long term care and offers new narrative possibilities that allow readers to re-examine ideas around long term care.

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Thank you again to Dr. Kriebernegg for taking the time to do an interview with me here on Dis(Abled) Embodiment.